A lovely treat through the letter box in Clare Fisher’s All the Good Things.  It was a rainy Monday and my kindle battery had died so I looked to my unread book shelf and this caught my eye.  From page one I was hooked in Beth’s story – at 21 years old she is in prison, and can only see the bad in herself.  When her psychiatrist suggests writing down all the good things she remembers Beth feels she will struggle.  Soon however she has remembered her job at the Odeon, Orange Wednesdays, being friends with Chantelle and “your dad”.

It’s not revealed until the end of the book why Beth is in prison, but I felt from reading you could probably begin to get an idea from reading between the lines.  In writing her notebook you become immersed in Beth’s life – her struggles with an absent mother, being passed through the foster care system and in believing she’d found love with a married man.  When she is pregnant she has little money and becomes embroiled in debt.

It’s difficult not to feel for Beth and by the end I was a little teary at her story – probably had more effect on me being a new mum myself that I could have more of a connection in that way to the character.

A great little page turner for a rainy day!

All The Good Things Book Cover All The Good Things
Clare Fisher
Penguin - Viking
01/06/2017
228

Twenty-one year old Beth is in prison. The thing she did is so bad she doesn't deserve ever to feel good again.
But her counsellor, Erika, won't give up on her. She asks Beth to make a list of all the good things in her life. So Beth starts to write down her story, from sharing silences with Foster Dad No. 1, to flirting in the Odeon on Orange Wednesdays, to the very first time she sniffed her baby's head.
But at the end of her story, Beth must confront the bad thing.
What is the truth hiding behind her crime? And does anyone - even a 100% bad person - deserve a chance to be good?

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